flood

It’s Flood Season! Here are some tips to help you prepare.

As the runoff season come into full swing, the chance for localized flooding increases.  If you live near waterways, or in drainage areas, preparing early can make a big difference in mitigating the potential for flooding and decreasing the chance of damage to your property.  For more local flood information, contact our Emergency Management office.

The following information contains excerpts from a FEMA Region VIII email:

See below for great tips to prepare you, your household, and your community.  Lots of additional info can be found at https://www.ready.gov/floods
When it’s not flooding – prepare by taking action:
  • Know your flood risk.
  • Make a flood emergency plan.
  • Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit, include a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
  • Consider buying flood insurance.
  • Familiarize yourself with local emergency plans. Know where to go and how to get there should you need to get to higher ground, the highest level of a building, or to evacuate.
  • Stay tuned to phone alerts, TV, or radio for weather updates, emergency instructions, or evacuation orders.
Remember flooding basics:
  • Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
  • Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down, and 2 feet of water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • If there is a chance of flash flooding, move immediately to higher ground. Flash floods are the #1 cause of weather-related deaths in the US.
  • If floodwaters rise around your car but the water is not moving, abandon the car and move to higher ground. Do not leave the car and enter moving water.
  • Avoid camping or parking along streams, rivers, and creeks during heavy rainfall. These areas can flood quickly and with little warning.
Social media posts for you to steal & share – spread the word:

Twitter:

  • #Floods occur in every U.S. state. Make sure your family is prepared & take action: www.ready.gov/floods #FloodSafety
  • #FloodSafety Tips: Charge mobile devices. Locate flashlights & radio. Tell friends/family your location in case of power loss.
  • Gather the supplies you may need in case a flood leaves you w/out power, water or gas. Supply list:http://1.usa.gov/1qGR7qN #FloodSafety
  • During severe weather Wireless Emergency Alerts can save your life. Watch how:http://youtu.be/wDpcGypv2_U #FloodSafety
  • Don’t let your business end up in a dumpster. Make a #FloodSafety plan today: http://go.usa.gov/37ePQ
  • Get your communication ON when the power’s OFF by packing a hand-crank radio, solar or car phone charger & batteries. #PrepareAthon

FaceBook:

  • Do you know where your family will be during a flood? Make a plan to connect during disasters by text, e-mail, social media & cell and practice your plan today.  http://1.usa.gov/1JPWKf0 #FloodSafety
  • In case you are not together when authorities issue a flood watch or flood warning, practice how you will communicate with each other. Sending texts is often faster than making a phone call. Keep important numbers written down in your wallet, not just in your phone. http://1.usa.gov/1JPWKf0 #FloodSafety
  • Floods can happen at any time!  Take simple steps to protect your family and property from the damaging impact of floods. Stay afloat by participating in America’s PrepareAthon grassroots campaign by registering at:www.ready.gov/prepare  #PrepareAthon
  • In a flood, a little water can do a lot of damage. Did you know that just 6 inches of flood water can cause thousands of dollars of damage, 12 inches is enough to float and carry away a small vehicle and 18 to 24 inches of rushing water can be enough to float and carry away a full size pickup truck or SUV? Get prepared now for floods http://1.usa.gov/1hty7xw #FloodSafety
If social media is your thing – there is a lot more where these came from
https://www.ready.gov/flood-toolkit 

National Weather Service releases flood potential outlook

The Riverton office of the National Weather Service has released their final 2014 “flood potential outlook” for Western Wyoming.  The area around LaBarge is listed as “moderate-high” potential, and parts of Star Valley are listed as “moderate”.  The rest of the County should have relatively low potential for flood events caused by waterways.  Residents of areas listed as “moderate” or “high” are encouraged to take mitigative action before runoff reaches its peak. Remember that extraordinary events, such as severe thunderstorms, sudden and prolonged increase in temperatures, as well as other factors can cause flooding anywhere in the County.  For questions regarding flood potential or how to prepare, contact Lincoln County Emergency Management at 307-885-3626 or 307-877-9835.

Lincoln County Flood Outlook Graphic

2014 Flooding Potential for Lincoln County from the National Weather Service