Britax Child Safety Seat Recall Information

Britax Child Safety, Inc., in cooperation with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and other regulatory authorities, is conducting a recall of the chest clip on certain B-Safe 35, B-Safe 35 Elite and BOB B-Safe 35 infant car seat models manufactured between November 1, 2015 and May 31, 2017

Britax has determined that the center tab on the chest clip can break presenting a choking hazard to an infant in the car seat.

No choking injuries have been reported.

Please check the website link provided here to view affected model numbers. If you find your seat is affected, follow the steps on the website for a free kit to replace the clips. As always, we encourage you to register your car seats with the registration cards provided to ensure that you receive notices of potential recalls.

Child Safety Seat Recall Notice

NHTSA Campaign Number: 17C001000

Manufacturer: Graco Children’s Products Inc.

Components: CHILD SEAT

Potential Number of Units Affected: 25,494

Summary

Graco Children’s Products Inc. (Graco) is recalling certain Graco My Ride 65 convertible child restraints, models 1871689, 1908152, 1813074, 1872691, 1853478, 1877535, 1813015, and 1794334. In the event of a crash, the child seat webbing may not adequately restrain the child. As such, these car seats fail to conform to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 213, “Child Restraint Systems.”

Remedy:

Graco will notify owners, and dealers will provide consumers with a replacement harness, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin July 17, 2017. Owners may contact Graco customer service at 1-800-345-4109.

Notes:

Owners may also contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Vehicle Safety Hotline at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), or go to www.safercar.gov.

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If you have not registered your car seat using the card included in all new safety seats, please do so. That is the way you will receive notice on safety seat recalls. If you can’t locate the registration card, visit the Safer Car website for a registration form and instructions.

Flood Update – Press Release

Stephen Malik, Public Information Officer
Lincoln County Emergency Management
pio@lcwy.org
AFTON, Wyoming – Temperatures in the 60’s and 70’s throughout the County have led to significant increases in snowmelt and runoff. The Salt River is under flood advisory as of Tuesday morning. The river is currently in action stage, but forecast to cross into minor flood stage by Tuesday evening and remain there through the end of the week. If warm temperatures persist, additional rise of the river is likely. If you live in the floodplain, take immediate action to protect your property.
Spring Creek and Crow Creek have overtopped their banks in and near Fairview. Water has encroached upon the roadways in Fairview, and Lincoln County Road & Bridge has closed Fairview North and Fairview South roads near the intersection with Crow Creek Road. There has also been damage to private roadways in the area, preventing access to some homes.
In the Freedom area, Tincup and Jackknife creeks are also flowing out of their banks in some locations, flooding livestock areas.
County and State resources are assisting with repairs to a levee NorthEast of Cokeville.
Homes throughout affected areas may experience subsurface water seeping up along waterways. Early preparation is key to mitigating flood impact to residential areas.
Residents in all areas of the County are encouraged to stay vigilant and ensure that preparations have been made to mitigate potential damage to homes, structures, property, and equipment.
Lincoln County Emergency Management is focused primarily on critical infrastructure protection, but will also make resources available for local residents to help protect their own homes. We are also coordinating with local municipalities to ensure that needed resources are on hand. Ultimately, the responsibility for protection of homes and property lies with the owner. Ensure that you have the proper insurance coverage for the area that you reside in.
Lincoln County Emergency Management will continue to provide information to residents and responders within our County to help everyone make informed decisions.

Safety is paramount

Whether or not flooding occurs in your area, waterways will be running high and swift. This increases danger to everyone near them, and especially for children.
If water covers all or part of a roadway, avoid driving through it, as you do not know the condition of the roadway underneath the water. Flooding can severely damage roadways and you risk damage to your vehicle or worse.
Flood waters can be contaminated with bacteria and other unhealthy substances. Avoid flood waters, and practice good hygiene at all times. Flooded structures, including homes, are at risk for mold, which can cause health problems for people and pets.

Stay informed

Residents are encouraged to stay informed by monitoring the National Weather Service – Riverton forecast office (www.weather.gov/riw),local radio stations, and social media (https://www.facebook.com/LincolnCountyOHS/). Lincoln County Emergency Management will give updates as situations change throughout the area.

Prepare your home

If you know that you are at risk of flooding, take actions to protect your home and property before the flooding begins. Move equipment and valuable items to higher ground, create barriers, and have flood insurance if you live in the floodplain. Have supplies and tools on hand to make additional provisions if needed. Ultimate responsibility for homes and property lies with the owner.

Be aware of alert systems

In emergency situations, notification is critical. Lincoln County currently has mass-call capability through a system called CodeRED, which allows us to notify people of urgent or emergent situations via phone, text, email, and through CodeRED app alerts. If you have a landline, your numbers are automatically added to the system once a year. If you need alerts on a cell phone, or other devices, go to our website (www.lcwy.org) and click on the “CodeRED” button to enter your cell phone or email information.
Another great source for emergency alerts is NOAA Weather Radio Public Alerts. If you have a weather radio with the Public Alert function, it can lie dormant until an alert is issued, at which time it will set off a tone and provide a warning message. This system is utilized not only for weather alerts, but also for other emergencies like Amber Alerts, Boil water orders, etc. For any questions, contact Lincoln County Emergency Management.

If you are affected by flooding

If flooding occurs in basements, pumps may be used to force water back outside your home, and to mitigate further damage to property. Channel water away from your home by digging trenches or using barriers. If you live inside a municipality, contact your local government leaders and notify them of the situation in your area. For residents living outside municipalities, or for any special needs situations or questions, please contact Lincoln County Emergency Management.
Report flooding through Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office dispatch at:
(307)885-5231 (Star Valley Area)
(307)877-3971 (Cokeville, Kemmerer, LaBarge Areas).
Sandbags are available for public use by contacting us through LCSO dispatch in your area.

Definitions:

Advisory – An advisory is an informational statement. Advisories give a “heads up” to help you know what may be possible in the short term so that you can take it into account when planning your daily activities.
Watch – A watch is issued when conditions are favorable for a significant weather event. When a watch is in effect, you should prepare yourself for in case action needs to be taken during an event.
Warning – Warnings are issued when a severe weather event is occurring or is imminent. This signifies the time to take immediate action.
SNOTEL SNOTEL is an automated system of snowpack and related climate sensors operated by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) of the United States Department of Agriculture in the Western United States. There are over 730 SNOTEL (or snow telemetry) sites in 11 states, including Alaska.
Snow Water EquivalentSnow Water Equivalent (SWE) is a common snowpack measurement. It is the amount of water contained within the snowpack. It can be thought of as the depth of water that would theoretically result if you melted the entire snowpack instantaneously.
For additional information, contact:
Stephen Malik, Public Information Officer
Lincoln County Emergency Management
pio@lcwy.org
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Air Quality Awareness Week!

Educate: Wildfires are a part of life in the west, and a single wildfire can burn thousands of acres before they are contained. Some wildfires are necessary for ecosystem health, but wildfires always produce smoke. Particulate matter, a term for small particles suspended in the air, are the primary pollutant in smoke from wildfires.

 

Enact: Particulate matter may lead to respiratory issues, even in healthy individuals, and may aggravate pre-existing respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality works with other agencies to monitor wildfire activity and evaluate potential impacts from smoke.

 

Empower: While the average Wyoming resident cannot fight a wildfire themselves (unless of course they are on a fire response team) there are strategies for reducing smoke exposure. AirNow recommends, among other things, staying indoors and running an air conditioner with a clean filter if possible. To see current air quality conditions in Wyoming for particulate matter and other pollutants visit http://www.wyvisnet.com/.

 

Additional sources:

Code Red Reminder!

Have you heard of the CodeRED system? It is a mass-notification system that can notify residents by phone, text, email, and through a smartphone app. If you have a landline, your phone number is updated in the system every November. If you don’t have a landline, would like to update information, or to receive emergency notifications by other means, fill out this form. This system is only used for emergency communications.

https://public.coderedweb.com/cne/en-US/5A0AA8D606C6

Flooding Press Release #2

Stephen Malik, Public Information Officer
Lincoln County Emergency Management
pio@lcwy.org
AFTON, Wyoming – The National Weather Service in Riverton, WY has issued a Flood Warning for all of Lincoln County as of late Wednesday. Salt River tributaries along the West side of Star Valley are rising significantly due to higher temperatures in the past week, and also precipitation both in the valley and surrounding mountains. Flooding has also begun near Cokeville.
Crow Creek has begun flooding low-lying areas in and around Fairview. Water levels have risen dramatically in the last few days. Flooding is encroaching upon roadways in the surrounding area, and nearing structures in the area as well. Tincup and other West-side tributaries of the Salt River are also fast becoming bank-full and beginning to flood surrounding areas. The Bear River, near Cokeville, has also begun flooding West of town, and also downstream towards Border. Residents in all areas of the County are encouraged to stay vigilant and ensure that preparations have been made to mitigate potential damage to homes, other structures, and equipment.
In coming days and weeks, as warmer temperatures begin to affect the upper elevations, this can dramatically increase flow rates in rivers and streams, potentially well above current levels. Waterways are being monitored continuously for flood risk in populated areas. Significant amounts of snow still remain in the flat areas along the valley floor in Star Valley. Many areas also have significant amounts of standing water in fields, due to snowmelt and precipitation. Residents should prepare for additional flooding along these waterways, and possibly at levels that have not been seen in recent years. Runoff season has only begun, and additional flooding is expected.
Lincoln County Emergency Management is focused primarily on critical infrastructure protection, but will also make resources available for local residents to help protect their own homes. We are also coordinating with local municipalities to ensure that needed resources are on hand.
There are currently no reports of homes directly affected by flooding waterways, but many homes and other structures lie in areas of risk. Early preparation is key to mitigating flood impact to residential areas.
Stay informed
Residents are encouraged to stay informed by monitoring the National Weather Service – Riverton forecast office (www.weather.gov/riw),local radio stations, and social media (https://www.facebook.com/LincolnCountyOHS/). Lincoln County Emergency Management will give updates as situations change throughout the area.
Prepare your home
If you know that you are at risk of flooding, take actions to protect your home and property before the flooding begins. Move equipment and valuable items to higher ground, create barriers, and have flood insurance if you live in the floodplain. Have supplies and tools on hand to make additional provisions if needed. Ultimate responsibility for homes and property lies with the owner.
Be aware of alert systems
In emergency situations, notification is critical. Lincoln County currently has mass-call capability through a system called CodeRED, which allows us to notify people of urgent or emergent situations via phone, text, email, and through CodeRED app alerts. If you have a landline, your numbers are automatically added to the system once a year. If you need alerts on a cell phone, or other devices, go to our website (www.lcwy.org) and click on the “CodeRED” button to enter your cell phone or email information.
Another great source for emergency alerts is NOAA Weather Radio Public Alerts. If you have a weather radio with the Public Alert function, it can lie dormant until an alert is issued, at which time it will set off a tone and provide a warning message. This system is utilized not only for weather alerts, but also for other emergencies like Amber Alerts, Boil water orders, etc. For any questions, contact Lincoln County Emergency Management.
If you are affected by flooding
If flooding occurs in basements, pumps may be used to force water back outside your home, and to mitigate further damage to property. Channel water away from your home by digging trenches or using barriers. If you live inside a municipality, contact your local government leaders and notify them of the situation in your area. For residents living outside municipalities, or for any special needs situations or questions, please contact Lincoln County Emergency Management.
Report flooding through Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office dispatch at: (307)885-5231 (Star Valley Area) or (307)877-3971 (Cokeville, Kemmerer, LaBarge Areas).
Sandbags are available for public use by contacting us through LCSO dispatch in your area.
Definitions:
Advisory – An advisory is an informational statement. Advisories give a “heads up” to help you know what may be possible in the short term so that you can take it into account when planning your daily activities.
Watch – A watch is issued when conditions are favorable for a significant weather event. When a watch is in effect, you should prepare yourself for in case action needs to be taken during an event.
Warning – Warnings are issued when a severe weather event is occurring or is imminent. This signifies the time to take immediate action.
For additional information, contact:
Stephen Malik, Public Information Officer
Lincoln County Emergency Management
pio@lcwy.org
# # #

Wyoming Department of Health: Keep Poison Help Number Handy

News from the Wyoming Department of Health

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Contact: Kim Deti, Wyoming Department of Health

Phone: 307-777-6001

Contact: Wyoming Poison Center

Phone: 303-520-9591 or email denverhealthmedia@dhha.org

 

Wyoming Department of Health: Keep Poison Help Number Handy

 

Keeping the Wyoming Poison Center number handy can help families stay safe and prevent poison-related tragedies, according to a Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) representative.

 

Wyoming Poison Center help can be reached by calling 1-800-222-1222. “We want people to keep this number visible in their homes and workplaces and to also consider programming it into their phones,” said Andy Gienapp, WDH Office of Emergency Medical Services manager.

 

Shireen Banerji, Wyoming Poison Center clinical manager, said “Poisonings can happen anywhere, anytime to anyone. We assume most poisonings happen to children who accidentally swallow something, and, yes, there are plenty of those situations. But adults can be poisoned at home or work by chemicals, pesticides, cleaners, bites and stings, medications and food.”

 

“Poison prevention requires vigilance from all members in the household and extended family, including babysitters, nannies and teachers,” Banerji said.

 

The Wyoming Poison Center handled more than 5,000 cases in 2016.

 

The WDH Office of Emergency Medical Services supports funding for Wyoming Poison Center services.  The center is part of the Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center (RMPDC), located in Denver.

 

Gienapp noted poisonings are the leading cause of death by injury. Related facts include:

  • Most poisoning deaths are due to misuse and abuse of licit and illicit drugs.
  • In 2015, about 57 percent of all exposure cases involved pharmaceuticals. Other exposures were to household products, plants, mushrooms, pesticides, animal bites and stings, carbon monoxide and many other types of non- pharmaceutical substances.
  • Ingestion was the exposure route in almost 84 percent of 2015 cases. People were also exposed through the lungs, skin, eyes and other routes.

 

For additional poisoning prevention tips and resources, visit the Rocky Mountain Poison & Drug Center website at www.rmpdc.org.

 

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