National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness Month Week Four: Get Involved! Be a Part of Something Larger

All content courtesy of Ready.gov

Ready Business

  • Get involved and share preparedness info in your community, faith-based organization, business & more: www.ready.gov
  • 40% of businesses never recover after a disaster. Watch this video and #PlanAhead: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2U0EFYKGn50&feature=youtu.be
  • Develop a preparedness program for your business to plan for & reduce the impact of disasters: www.ready.gov/business
  • Planning ahead for disasters can be the difference between going out of business and running a successful one.

Ready Campus

  • Make sure your campus is a #ReadyCampus and prepared for all types of emergencies. Get involved: www.ready.gov/campus
  • Make sure your school has emergency procedures in place for disasters that could affect your campus.
  • Know how to get in touch with family/friends if phones are down. Text instead of call and mark yourself as safe on social media.
  • If you can’t get in touch with family/friends after a disaster, register yourself as “Safe and Well” on the Red Cross’ website 
  • Sign up to receive alerts from your school in case of an emergency like an active shooter event or natural disaster.

Faith-Based Preparedness

  • Keep your congregation safe – make sure your house of worship has a plan for all types of emergencies.
  • Faith-based venues can become targets. Protect your congregation & house of worship by preparing for emergencies: www.fema.gov/faith-resources
  • Take steps to protect your house of worship from arson. Illuminate the exterior/entrances and clear anything that could fuel fire.
  • Get involved. Advocate including people with disabilities and others with access and functional needs into emergency planning in your community. Ready.gov/myplan. Brought to you by the Ad Council and Ready. 

National Preparedness Month Week Three: Practice and Build Out Your Plans

Practice and Build Out Your Plans
All content courtesy Ready.gov 

  • Complete an Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK)
  • Maintain emergency savings for use in case of an emergency
  • Participate in an emergency drill
  • Know how to access community resources (e.g., shelters, food banks)
  • What important docs should you have in your emergency kit? The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit explains them all: https://go.usa.gov/xNhp6
  • How will you pay your bills if a disaster strikes? Disasters don’t plan ahead, you can: www.ready.gov/financial-preparedness 
  • Maintain emergency savings in case of a disasters.
  • Do you know how to access community resources where you live? Search online today.
  • Make digital copies of important documents and save them on the cloud or a secure cell phone app in case disaster strikes.
  • Have at least a one-week supply of medications.
  • Flood insurance policies have a 30-day waiting period before they go into effect. Plan now for floods www.floodsmart.gov
  • Give yourself financial peace of mind & create an emergency savings account that can be used in a crisis.
  • Financial prep tip: gather & store critical personal, household, & medical information for easy access during a disaster.

 Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

 

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

National Preparedness Month Week Two: Plan to Help Your Neighbors and Friends

Lincoln County Emergency Management holds CERT classes during the Spring and Fall, pending participation. Classes are weekly on Thursday evenings for 6 weeks culminating in one Saturday skills check off course. The skills learned at CERT are invaluable for if and when disaster and emergencies strike.

September is National Preparedness Month!

 

Week One: Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends
*All content courtesy of Ready.gov 

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

  1. How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?
  2. What is my shelter plan?
  3. What is my evacuation route?
  4. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:

  • Different ages of members within your household
  • Responsibilities for assisting others
  • Locations frequented
  • Dietary needs
  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment
  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment
  • Languages spoken
  • Cultural and religious considerations
  • Pets or service animals
  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan

Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to create your own.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

Visit Ready.gov for handy downloadable templates for family emergency plans, pet owners emergency plans, and other information that will get you started on having your own plans in place for when disasters/emergencies happen.

The official logo for National Preparedness Month 2017. [High Resolution JPG]

NPM: Connecting with Family During an Emergency

Disaster could strike at anytime! It is very possible that you and your family will not be together, some
may be at work, school, traveling, out shopping, or somewhere in between. Because of this, it is very
important that you have a family communications plan. Planning recommendations include:

  •  Identify an out-of-town contact, such as a friend or relative, who family members can call to let
    them know they are safe. It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town,
    because phone lines can be jammed. An out-of-town contact may be in a better position to
    communicate among separated family members.
  •  Teach your family members how to text. It may seem like second nature to some of us, but not
    everyone texts. During an emergency, it is often easier to get a text message delivered rather than a
    phone call.
  • If you have a cell phone, program that person(s) as “ICE” (In Case of Emergency) in your phone.
    If you are in an accident, emergency personnel will often check your ICE listings in order to get a hold
    of someone you know. Make sure to tell your family and friends that you have listed them as
    emergency contacts.
  • Subscribe to an emergency alert system. Check with your local health department or emergency
    management agency to see if there is one offered for your area. Post emergency telephone numbers
    by home phones or save them in your cell phone (fire, police, ambulance, etc.).
  • Teach children how and when to call 911 for help.
  • Identify a location to meet in town and out of town
    For more information and templates for developing a Family Communication Plan, visit
    http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

The Ready.gov Make A Plan site includes information and templates for:
 Family Communication during an emergency
 Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids
 School and workplace plans
 Commuter Emergency Plan

Download this Family_Emegency_Plan and this Family Communication Plan today.


 

All information in this blog post is courtesy of FEMA and Wyoming Department of Health Emergency Preparedness. 

September is National Preparedness Month

AP!_General_Web_Banner_300x250Are you and your family prepared if disaster strikes? The universal building blocks of preparedness are:

1. Be Informed

2. Make a Plan

3. Build a Kit

4. Get Involved

Last year was an important reminder to all of us that disasters can strike anytime and anyplace. Nearly every region
of the country experienced some form of extreme weather event, including devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma,
scorching wildfires near Yosemite National Park, and destructive flooding in Colorado.

As with many life events, preparation is the key to success. When you prepare and practice for an emergency in
advance of an event, it makes a real difference in your ability to take immediate and informed action when it matters
most. Early action can also help you to recover more quickly.

That’s why thousands of individuals, organizations, schools, houses of worship, and local governments across the
Nation are actively participating in a new national campaign for action – America’s PrepareAthon!
(www.ready.gov/prepare).

Preparing for disasters is a year-round activity. It’s not a matter of if the next disaster will happen, but when. Start taking action and prepare now! Simple steps such as having a discussion and/or conducting a quick drill can help determine what you need to do next to become more prepared. Be smart, take part, and prepare for emergencies before they strike!

 


The information in this blog post is courtesy of FEMA and Wyoming Department of Health Emergency Preparedness.