Month: September 2014

Flu Vaccine is In!

Flu shots are now available at the Public Health offices in Afton and Kemmerer.

whoneedsvaccine_red_120x600The vaccine is the standard trivalent (2 A strains and 1 B strain) and is available to all people ages 6 months and up. The cost for a flu vaccine for ages 3 years and up is $20. The cost for a child ages 6 months to 2 years is $10. We accept Medicare, Medicaid, Kidcare Chip, Blue Cross Blue Shield, and most other private insurances. Please bring your cards with you in order to receive your shots. You can call and make an appointment for your shots or walk in as long as a nurse is in to administer the vaccine.

We will have our standard flu shot clinics all through the month of October. Visit the  Flu Shots page for a current schedule of our clinics. Do your part to help keep knock the flu out of our communities – get immunized!

Contact the Kemmerer office at 877-3780 and the Afton office at 885-9598 to make your flu shot appointments.

official flu fighter

NPM: Connecting with Family During an Emergency

Disaster could strike at anytime! It is very possible that you and your family will not be together, some
may be at work, school, traveling, out shopping, or somewhere in between. Because of this, it is very
important that you have a family communications plan. Planning recommendations include:

  •  Identify an out-of-town contact, such as a friend or relative, who family members can call to let
    them know they are safe. It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town,
    because phone lines can be jammed. An out-of-town contact may be in a better position to
    communicate among separated family members.
  •  Teach your family members how to text. It may seem like second nature to some of us, but not
    everyone texts. During an emergency, it is often easier to get a text message delivered rather than a
    phone call.
  • If you have a cell phone, program that person(s) as “ICE” (In Case of Emergency) in your phone.
    If you are in an accident, emergency personnel will often check your ICE listings in order to get a hold
    of someone you know. Make sure to tell your family and friends that you have listed them as
    emergency contacts.
  • Subscribe to an emergency alert system. Check with your local health department or emergency
    management agency to see if there is one offered for your area. Post emergency telephone numbers
    by home phones or save them in your cell phone (fire, police, ambulance, etc.).
  • Teach children how and when to call 911 for help.
  • Identify a location to meet in town and out of town
    For more information and templates for developing a Family Communication Plan, visit
    http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

The Ready.gov Make A Plan site includes information and templates for:
 Family Communication during an emergency
 Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids
 School and workplace plans
 Commuter Emergency Plan

Download this Family_Emegency_Plan and this Family Communication Plan today.


 

All information in this blog post is courtesy of FEMA and Wyoming Department of Health Emergency Preparedness. 

September is National Preparedness Month

AP!_General_Web_Banner_300x250Are you and your family prepared if disaster strikes? The universal building blocks of preparedness are:

1. Be Informed

2. Make a Plan

3. Build a Kit

4. Get Involved

Last year was an important reminder to all of us that disasters can strike anytime and anyplace. Nearly every region
of the country experienced some form of extreme weather event, including devastating tornadoes in Oklahoma,
scorching wildfires near Yosemite National Park, and destructive flooding in Colorado.

As with many life events, preparation is the key to success. When you prepare and practice for an emergency in
advance of an event, it makes a real difference in your ability to take immediate and informed action when it matters
most. Early action can also help you to recover more quickly.

That’s why thousands of individuals, organizations, schools, houses of worship, and local governments across the
Nation are actively participating in a new national campaign for action – America’s PrepareAthon!
(www.ready.gov/prepare).

Preparing for disasters is a year-round activity. It’s not a matter of if the next disaster will happen, but when. Start taking action and prepare now! Simple steps such as having a discussion and/or conducting a quick drill can help determine what you need to do next to become more prepared. Be smart, take part, and prepare for emergencies before they strike!

 


The information in this blog post is courtesy of FEMA and Wyoming Department of Health Emergency Preparedness.