Month: September 2017

National Preparedness Month Week Three: Practice and Build Out Your Plans

Practice and Build Out Your Plans
All content courtesy Ready.gov 

  • Complete an Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK)
  • Maintain emergency savings for use in case of an emergency
  • Participate in an emergency drill
  • Know how to access community resources (e.g., shelters, food banks)
  • What important docs should you have in your emergency kit? The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit explains them all: https://go.usa.gov/xNhp6
  • How will you pay your bills if a disaster strikes? Disasters don’t plan ahead, you can: www.ready.gov/financial-preparedness 
  • Maintain emergency savings in case of a disasters.
  • Do you know how to access community resources where you live? Search online today.
  • Make digital copies of important documents and save them on the cloud or a secure cell phone app in case disaster strikes.
  • Have at least a one-week supply of medications.
  • Flood insurance policies have a 30-day waiting period before they go into effect. Plan now for floods www.floodsmart.gov
  • Give yourself financial peace of mind & create an emergency savings account that can be used in a crisis.
  • Financial prep tip: gather & store critical personal, household, & medical information for easy access during a disaster.

 Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

 

Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make a family emergency plan today. September is National Preparedness Month. Learn more at www.ready.gov/September.

 

Protect Yourself from Wildfire Smoke

All information provided from CDC.gov

Who is at greatest risk from wildfire smoke?

  • People who have heart or lung diseases, like heart disease, chest pain, lung disease, or asthma, are at higher risk from wildfire smoke.
  • Older adults are more likely to be affected by smoke. This may be due to their increased risk of heart and lung diseases.
  • Children are more likely to be affected by health threats from smoke. Children’s airways are still developing and they breathe more air per pound of body weight than adults. Also, children often spend more time outdoors engaged in activity and play.

Take steps to decrease your risk from wildfire smoke.

  • Check local air quality reports. Listen and watch for news or health warnings about smoke. Find out if your community provides reports about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Quality Index (AQI) or check the report on AirNow.gov. In addition, pay attention to public health messages about safety measures.
  • Consult local visibility guides. Some communities have monitors that measure the amount of particles in the air. In the western United States, some states and communities have guidelines to help people determine if there are high levels of particulates in the air by how far they can see.
  • Keep indoor air as clean as possible if you are advised to stay indoors. Keep windows and doors closed. Run an air conditioner, but keep the fresh-air intake closed and the filter clean to prevent outdoor smoke from getting inside. If you do not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside with the windows closed, seek shelter in a designated evacuation center or away from the affected area.
  • Avoid activities that increase indoor pollution. Burning candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves can increase indoor pollution. Vacuuming stirs up particles already inside your home, contributing to indoor pollution. Smoking also puts even more pollution into the air.
  • Prevent wildfires from starting. Prepare, build, maintain and extinguish campfires safely. Follow local regulations if you burn trash or debris. Check with your local fire department to be sure the weather is safe enough for burning.
  • Follow the advice of your doctor or other healthcare provider about medicines and about your respiratory management plan if you have asthma or another lung disease. Consider evacuating if you are having trouble breathing. Call your doctor for  advice if your symptoms worsen.
  • Do not rely on dust masks for protection. Paper “comfort” or “dust” masks commonly found at hardware stores are designed to trap large particles, such as sawdust. These masks will not protect your lungs from the small particles found in wildfire smoke.
  • Evacuate from the path of wildfires. Listen to the news to learn about current evacuation orders. Follow the instructions of local officials about when and where to evacuate. Take only essential items with you. Follow designated evacuation routes–others may be blocked–and plan for heavy traffic.

National Preparedness Month Week Two: Plan to Help Your Neighbors and Friends

Lincoln County Emergency Management holds CERT classes during the Spring and Fall, pending participation. Classes are weekly on Thursday evenings for 6 weeks culminating in one Saturday skills check off course. The skills learned at CERT are invaluable for if and when disaster and emergencies strike.

September is National Preparedness Month!

 

Week One: Make a Plan for Yourself, Family and Friends
*All content courtesy of Ready.gov 

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

  1. How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?
  2. What is my shelter plan?
  3. What is my evacuation route?
  4. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:

  • Different ages of members within your household
  • Responsibilities for assisting others
  • Locations frequented
  • Dietary needs
  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment
  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment
  • Languages spoken
  • Cultural and religious considerations
  • Pets or service animals
  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan

Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to create your own.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

Visit Ready.gov for handy downloadable templates for family emergency plans, pet owners emergency plans, and other information that will get you started on having your own plans in place for when disasters/emergencies happen.

The official logo for National Preparedness Month 2017. [High Resolution JPG]