fact vs fiction masks
fiction
Your face covering protects you from getting COVID19
fact

Face coverings help to prevent a potentially infected wearer from spreading disease to others (this is called Source Control). Studies have found a significant number of presymptomatic or asymptomatic carriers may unknowingly spread the virus. Respiratory droplets are one of the modes of person-to-person spread of the COVID19 virus. Clinical & laboratory studies show face coverings reduce the spray of droplets when worn over the nose and mouth.

 https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover-guidance.html

                          https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32371934/

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 ASYMPTOMATIC PEOPLE ACCOUNT FOR UP TO 45% OF COVID19 INFECTIONS.

https://neurosciencenews.com/asymptomatic-coronavirus-16534/

UNIVERSAL MASKING HAS REDUCED INFECTION RATES IN SEVERAL COUNTRIES

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31142-9/fulltext

https://today.tamu.edu/2020/06/12/texas-am-study-face-masks-critical-in-preventing-spread-of-covid-19/



fiction
If the mask covers just my mouth, it’s fine. 
fact

Masks must fit snugly over the nose and chin to create the best possible seal. Leaving your nose uncovered leaves you vulnerable to inhaling or expelling viral particles while breathing, coughing or sneezing. 
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fitting-cloth-facemask-small

fiction
Wearing a mask can make people sick from carbon dioxide poisoning
fact

Face coverings DO NOT accumulate enough carbon dioxide to cause harm and because most people will NOT be wearing a mask for hours or days, the risk of such poisoning is NONEXISTENT. Masks are safe when worn properly.

“Because these are loose-fitting face coverings that do not prevent gas exchange, they are not expected to result in any retention of carbon dioxide that would be a risk to the wearer. To be cautious, these face coverings are not recommended for those with underlying breathing problems, although there is no evidence to suggest that they cause harm in these individuals, and many of these individuals can likely wear them safely. The main concern is for individuals who are physically unable to remove a face covering if needed, which is why face coverings are not recommended for children under 2 or individuals who may not be able to remove the face covering.” - Alexia Harrist, Wyoming Department of Health Epidemiologist& State Health Officer

 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover-guidance.html#not-wear


fictionEveryone should wear an N95 or surgical mask

fact

Medical grade masks such as N95s and surgical masks are critical supplies that need to be reserved for healthcare workers and medical first responders. Simple cloth face coverings to prevent spread can be purchased just about anywhere now and can even be fashioned from at home materials such as t-shirts.

fictionIf we wear masks, we don’t need to social distance 

fact
Masks are not airtight so the combination of maintaining distance, avoiding large gatherings, and frequently washing hands before touching your face in combination are the best way to protect yourself and others. 

Remember

1)   Face coverings are safe when worn properly (they must be made of breathable fabric, fit snugly against the sides of the face and cover both the nose and mouth).

2)   Face coverings reduce the potential spread of disease to others, especially by pre-symptomatic or asymptomatic carriers.

3)   Face coverings are washable and should be washed after each use with a bleach solution and be completely dry prior to donning.

4)   Face coverings work in conjunction with the current guidelines of social distancing, avoiding large gatherings, staying home when ill, and good, thorough hand hygiene.

5)   Face coverings do not allow sick people to be out in the public. If you are sick with any COVID19 or respiratory illness symptom, stay home except to get medical care! 

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